Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Graceling_coverTitleGraceling

Author: Kristin Cashore

ISBN: 978-0-15-206396-2

Publication Date: 2008

Genre: Fantasy

Reading Level/Interest Age: 14 and up

Plot: Certain people live with powerful abilities and these people are called “Gracelings.” You can tell that they are graced because they have discolored eyes and most regal leaders have authority over them to do their bidding. Katsa is a graceling and she is graced with the art to kill. Her uncle Randa is the king of Middluns and he forces her to carry out his every order, which is usually to kill those who disobey him. Because Katsa complies, her reputation is seen as a vicious killing machine and everyone fears her when they catch sight of her. While on a rescue mission, she comes across a young man who is able to prevent each of her attacks and is startled by this and kidnaps him. She later finds out that he has a grace as well but she cannot quite figure out. Soon enough, she will discover what his ability is and his plans that he must carry out.

Critical Evaluation: The suspenseful twists and turns in this book are what excited me the most while reading. Cashore does a well done job at illustrating all the details from the dramatic stand stills to the action filled fighting sequences. Katsa’s realization of Po’s Grace creates heated moments between the two and sparks start to fly. When they both come to the conclusion that Katsa’s Grace is not the art of killing but the skill of survival, relieves both Katsa and the reader that she is not someone to be frightened of. Tragic happening on Po’s loss of his eyesight is quite a devastating event when Katsa finds out and the emotional struggle that he went through was almost heart wrenching.

Reader’s Annotation: Katsa has the ability to kill whoever she pleases, which takes a toll on herself. But all this changes when she meets a young man with an interesting ability as well.

Author: Retrieved from Kristin Cashore’s “A Short Bio” page on her official website –

“I grew up in the countryside of northeastern Pennsylvania in a village with cows and barns and beautiful views from the top of the hill and all that good stuff. I lived in a rickety old house with my parents, three sisters, and a scattering of cats, and I READ READ READ READ READ. I read while brushing my teeth, I read while chopping parsley, the first thing I reached for when I woke up in the morning was my book; the only two places I didn’t read were in the car and in bed. What did I do then? The one thing I liked even more than reading: I daydreamed.

And so, without knowing it, I was planting the seeds. Reading and daydreaming = perfect preparation for writing.

At 18 I went off to college– thank you, Williams College, for the financial aid that made this possible– and it almost killed me. College is hard, man, and the Berkshires are cloudy. A (phenomenal) year studying abroad in sunny Sydney revived me. After college I developed a compulsive moving problem: New York City, Boston, Cambridge, Austin, Pennsylvania, Italy, and even a short stint in London, where my showerhead hung from the cutest little stand that was exactly like the cradle of an old-fashioned telephone. The best phone calls are the pretend phone calls made from your telephone tub.

During my stint in Boston, I got an M.A. at the Center for the Study of Children’s Literature at Simmons College. (Thank you, Simmons, for the scholarship that made this possible!) Grad school almost killed me, but I felt a lot more alive than when I was almost being killed in college. The Simmons program is stupendous. It got me thinking and breathing YA books. It got me writing.

Since Simmons, I haven’t stopped writing, not once. I’ve developed a compulsive writing problem that makes my moving problem look like a charming personality quirk. I can’t stop! But it’s not actually a problem, because I don’t want to stop. I’ve been writing full-time for a bunch of years now, first doing educational writing for the K-6 market and now working on my novels. It’s a dream job, which is another way of saying that when I shop for work clothes, I go straight to the pajamas section.

A few years ago I grew tired of all the moving and dealt with it by, um, moving, from Jacksonville, Florida, to Cambridge, Massachusetts, trading the St. Johns River for the Charles River and pelicans for geese. As a native northerner, it’s nice to be back in the land of four seasons. I feel as if I’ve come home. :o)”

Curriculum Ties: N/A

Booktalking Ideas:

  • What abilities or graces could help a king rule his kingdom?

Challenging Issues:

  • Sexual content
  • Violence

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Book? I am always a fan of fantasy books and this one was one of the best that I have read so far.

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Hope in Patience by Beth Fehlbaum

hope in patienceTitleHope In Patience

Author: Beth Fehlbaum

ISBN: 978-1-934813-41-6

Publication Date: 2010

Genre: Realistic fiction

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15 and up

Plot: Ashley Asher has recently moved to Patience, Texas after she has been removed from her abusive home with her mother and her stepfather, who has broken her arm and raped her. Now she lives with her biological father and his family. Ashley begins to live the life of a normal teenager at her new school but the harsh experiences that she’s faced makes this a little difficult. Trying to live a normal life can be quite challenging especially if she must stand in a court to fight against her stepfather. However there are a few people that are able to help her along the way. She sees her therapist Dr. Matt, she creates a very close friendship with Z. Z., and she has a liking for boy at school named Joshua.

Critical Evaluation: This book illustrates a detailed story about a teenage girl going through an emotional and trying part in her life. This being Fehlbaum’s semiautobiographical work, her detailed writing about Ashley allows the reader to emotionally connect with her and can follow with the difficult healing process after being sexually abused. Through the healing process, many can see that it is easier said than done. Her emotional mindset is almost set in its ways because of her terrifying past, which then leads her to do things that she never would have expected to do. The overall theme of this story is the sexual abuse that so many teens face today. This book can show those that are abused that they are not the only ones who are experiencing this and that there is a way out.

Reader’s Annotation: Sexually abused Ashley Asher tries to live a normal life in Patience, Texas but finds this very difficult for her because her past still haunts her.

Author: Retrieved from author’s official website –

“   I was born in Dallas, Texas, and I have one brother, who is a police sergeant. My husband and I were high school sweethearts, and we married young. We have three daughters who are amazing and brilliant. My oldest is getting her doctorate in Sociology; my middle daughter is getting her MFA in Publishing and Creative Writing, and my youngest child is studying to be a neonatal nurse.

When my youngest daughter started Kindergarten, I went to college to be a teacher, like Ashley’s stepmom in the Patiencebooks. Bev Asher and I share a passion for teaching, social justice, and insisting upon authenticity in the classroom. I have a B.A. in English, minor Secondary Education, from the University of Texas at Arlington,  and an M.Ed. in Elementary Education, specializing in Reading, from Texas A & M — Commerce.

I still teach. I taught middle schoolers for the first part of my career, and now I teach 5th grade students in a bilingual education program in East Texas. I am fortunate to love both my jobs, as teacher and author! I cannot imagine a more perfect existence than the one I have. My favorite place in the world is my front porch. I write books there in the summer at a table built by a good friend”

Curriculum Ties:

  • Sexual abuse
  • Post traumatic stress disorder
  • Psychology

Booktalking Ideas:

  • If you had a thought in the back of your mind that kept nagging at you, what would you do get rid of that thought?

Challenging Issues:

  • Sexual abuse
  • Religious viewpoints

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Movie? Even though the book was quite an emotional struggle, I was able to connect with the character and understand what she was going through.

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The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

The_Outsiders_bookTitleOutsiders

Author: S.E. Hinton

ISBN: 9780142407332

Publication Date: 1967

Genre: Realistic fiction

Reading Level/Interest Age: 13 and up

Plot: The setting takes place in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1965 and is about two rival gangs, the Greasers and the Socs. Ponyboy, a member of the Greasers, has experienced many fights and understands the intensity between the two gangs. Him and his gang members encounter brawls with the Socs and eventually find themselves in deeper trouble as time goes by. A series of unfortunate events continue to appear and Ponyboy must struggle with the loss of loved ones and is consumed with constant aggressive behavior.

Critical Evaluation: Hinton does an impressive job at informing the reader of the seriousness of gangs and violence in low socioeconomic areas. Teens growing up in neighborhoods where gang members are patrolling the area are susceptible to be initiated in dangerous incidences. Although there is a serious stigma on teens in gangs, Hinton has shown to the reader how these members all are important in each other’s lives even though they live a dangerous lifestyle. One other element to take into consideration is the dialogue that Hinton uses. Interactions between the teens are slightly difficult to understand because of the slang that was used during the 1960s.

Reader’s Annotation: Ponyboy and his friends are all members in a gang that always runs into trouble. Little do they know that there will be challenging trials ahead.

Author: Retrieved from S.E. Hinton’s “biography” page on her official website

“Susan Eloise Hinton was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She has always enjoyed reading but wasn’t satisfied with the literature that was being written for young adults, which influenced her to write novels like The Outsiders. That book, her first novel, was published in 1967 by Viking.

Once published, The Outsiders gave her a lot of publicity and fame, and also a lot of pressure. S.E. Hinton was becoming known as “The Voice of the Youth” among other titles. This kind of pressure and publicity resulted in a three year long writer’s block.

Her boyfriend (and now, her husband),who had gotten sick of her being depressed all the time, eventually broke this block. He made her write two pages a day if she wanted to go anywhere. This eventually led to That Was Then, This Is Now.

That Was Then, This Is Now is known to be a much more well thought out book than The Outsiders. Because she read a lot of great literature and wanted to better herself, she made sure that she wrote each sentence exactly right. She continued to write her two pages a day until she finally felt it was finished in the summer of 1970, she got married a few months later. That Was Then, This is Now was published in 1971.

In 1975, S.E. Hinton published Rumble Fish as a novel (she had published a short story version in a 1968 edition of Nimrod, which was a literary supplement for the University of Tulsa Alumni Magazine).

Rumble Fish was the shortest novel she had published. It received a great deal of contrasting opinions, with one reviewer claiming it to be her best book and the next claiming it to be her last.

The latter was apparently wrong. Tex was published in 1979, four years after Rumble Fish. It received great reviews and people raved about how the writing style had matured since previous publications. Tex would be the last book S.E. Hinton published for nine years. After another span of four years, S.E. Hinton’s son, Nick was born.

Four years after Tex was released, quite a few major events took place in S.E. Hinton’s life. In March of 1983, the movie The Outsiders was released. The following August, Nicholas David was born. Two months later the movie Rumble Fish was released.

In 1985 the movie version of That Was Then, This Is Now was released. Three years later S.E. Hinton became the first person to receive the YASD/SLJ Author Achievement Award, which was given by the Young Adult Services Division of the American Library Association and School Library Journal.

Taming The Star Runner was released in October of that year. It was the first book that S.E. Hinton had published that wasn’t in first person. With a seven-year wait, S.E. Hinton released another book in 1995. This time she did something that no one expected.

Big David, Little David was written for children around the kindergarten age. This deviation from Teen fiction seems to be a reflection of the current important things in S.E. Hinton’s life: Family. The children’s fiction trend continues with her latest release- The Puppy Sister, which is a fantasy book written for Elementary school level children.”

Curriculum Ties:

  • Gang related violence
  • Coping
  • Aggressive behavior

Booktalking Ideas:

  • How well do you think Hinton did on portraying the male protagonist, Ponyboy?

Challenging Issues:

  • Violence
  • Alcohol
  • Profanity

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Movie? The immense amount of drama between the young boys fueled my interest throughout the entire book.

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Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

ThirteenReasonsWhyTitleThirteen Reasons Why

Author: Jay Asher

ISBN: 978-1-59514-188-0

Publication Date: 2007

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Reading Level/Interest Age: 14 and up

Plot: Clay Jensen receives a shoebox filled with 7 cassette tapes when he returns home each side marked in numerical order and Clay wonders what they all contain. Managing to find a stereo with audio tape capability, he listens to the first tape and cannot believe that the recorded voice is the recently passed Hannah Baker who committed suicide. Apparently each side of the cassettes focuses on a specific individual who had a part to play that led to her gradual state of depression and Clay was one of them. Horrified by this realization, he does all that he can to complete the entire set in order to figure out what his role was that made her take her life.

Critical Evaluation: The events that are spoken through the voice of Hannah should be taken very seriously because of the lasting effects they can have. Every occurrence that leads to Hannah’s breaking point takes a toll on her and yet no one never even stopped to think about how their actions had done so much. Luckily for Clay, Hannah confesses saying that he does not deserve to be on the tapes, or at least not in the same category as the others that are mentioned, but his inability to pursue a great friendship and possible relationship with Hannah was the reason why she had recorded about him. Asher has opened the eyes of many through the eyes (in this case, voice) of a suicide victim. Also, making Clay the protagonist and his influence on Hannah explains to readers that stepping back from or avoiding a troubled friend can indirectly hurt the person. Similar to the other cases where their actions directly affected Hannah, doing nothing or not getting involved can be just as bad.

Reader’s Annotation: Seven recorded tapes by the recently passed Hannah Baker are at Clay Jensen’s front porch to explain to him how he was one of the thirteen reasons why she committed suicide.

Author: Retrieved from the official website of Thirteen Reasons Why

JAY ASHER has worked at an independent bookstore, an outlet bookstore, a chain bookstore, and two public libraries. He hopes, someday, to work for a used bookstore. When he is not writing, Jay plays guitar and goes camping. Thirteen Reasons Why is his first published novel

Curriculum Ties:

  • Teen suicide
  • Bullying

Booktalking Ideas:

  • How would you change your habits if you were on those tapes?
  • What would you do if you noticed a potential suicide victim?

Challenging Issues:

  • Suicide
  • Profanity
  • Sexual content

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Movie? I was moved after reading this book. The unique style of how Asher uses recorded tapes to portray the victim is quite different and interesting.

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Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead

books_vampireacademy_bigTitleVampire Academy

Author: Richelle Mead

ISBN: 978-1-59514-174-3

Publication Date: 2007

Genre: Fanatasy

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15 and up

Plot: Rose Hathaway is a Dhampir, which makes her half human and half vampire, and is sworn to protect her best friend Lissa who is a mortal vampire also know as a Moroi. Rose and Lissa have a magical bond where Rose is able to feel every emotion that Lissa feels. After running away from St. Vladamir’s Academy for two years, they’re finally caught and dragged back to the school grounds. The school is organized to educate people like Rose and Lissa on subjects such as the usual courses that human teens learn but also the fundamentals about Morois and Dhampirs. As Rose and Lissa continue to reintegrate to the academy life, new obstacles come their way and Rose must protect Lissa from incredible dangers from the bloodthirsty immortal vampires called the Strigoi.

Critical Evaluation: The influence from Romanian folklore is evident among this novel. Terms such as Moroi, Dhampirs, and Strigoi are originated from Romania’s known mythology. For those who are not familiar with Romanian pronunciations, this can be slightly difficult for the readers, especially those who pay close attention to detail.

One particular element that stood out in this book is the mentioning of addiction from a vampire’s bite and fueling that craving. Rose describes the effects of the bite that creates a euphoric like state to the victim. In order to feed the Moroi students at the academy, drug addicted humans willingly volunteer their bodies in order fuel their addiction.

Reader’s Annotation: There are bloodthirsty immortal vampires are on the hunt for Rose’s best friend, Lissa, and the iron gates of St. Vladimir’s Academy are not strong enough to protect them. Will Rose be able to protect her?

Author: Retrieved from Richelle Mead’s “About Richelle” page on her official website –

“Scorpio Richelle Mead is a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of urban fantasy books for both adults and teens.  Originally from Michigan, Richelle now lives in Seattle, Washington where she works on her three series full-time. Before becoming a writer, she considered a few different career paths. She received a liberal arts degree from the University of Michigan, an MA in Comparative Religion from Western Michigan University, and a Master in Teaching (Middle & High School English) degree from the University of Washington. In the end, she decided writing was the way for her but believes all of her education prepared her for it.

A life-long reader, Richelle has always had a particular fascination with mythology and folklore. When not writing,, she enjoys bad reality TV, traveling, trying interesting cocktails, and shopping for dresses. Lots of dresses. She is a self-professed coffee addict, fights a constant (and losing) battle with procrastination, and has a passion for all things wacky and humorous.”

Curriculum Ties: N/A

Booktalking Ideas: N/A

Challenging Issues:

  • Sexual content
  • Religious viewpoints

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Book? I thought that the influence of Romanian folklore was different and very interesting to learn about. This made the book more unique and stand out compared to other young adult vampire novels.

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Peeps by Scott Westerfield

peepsTitlePeeps

Author: Scott Westerfield

ISBN: 9781595120838

Publication Date: 2005

Genre: Fantasy

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15 and up

Plot: Cal Thompson, a nineteen year old, is infected with a very strange parasite that seems to be infecting others throughout the city at a rapid speed. Luckily he’s only a “carrier,” which means that he exhibits symptoms such as constant sexual arousal and heightened senses and he is not subject to the harsh symptoms of the disease. Those that are that parasite positive – peeps – are less fortunate experience dementia and vicious behavior to those that were once loved by the victim. Cal has joined the secret government organization, The Night Watch, to hunt down peeps to prevent them from accidentally infecting others.

Critical Evaluation: Westerfield has concocted a new way of teaching biology. Every other chapter sets the reader aside from the narrative story to learn about different parasites in the animal kingdom and how they strangely work with other organisms. Some of the parasites to keep in mind are the trematodes that live in a continuous cycle between snails’ left eye and the stomachs of birds. By incorporating these short biology lessons, the author is able to inform the reader that even though the parasites in the narrative are not real, there are living organisms that infect others (animal or human) and work in a strange manner. Not only has Westerfield been able to incorporate various different types of species in separate chapters, he has also made biology and the human body an important element in his story. As Cal and the Night Watch are a constant search for peeps, there are little lessons here and there about the immune systems and such. A hint of symbolism is an interesting element to point out as well. The immune system is an organized process that helps protect us from getting sick or keeping us at a normal and healthy state. Towards the end, after Cal and Lace have been informed about the enormous worm-like creatures that are trying to rise from below the earth, they had come to the conclusion that they themselves are the immune system of the human race.

Reader’s Annotation: Cal is a carrier of a parasite that can be spread to other humans and, unfortunately, he has.

Author: Retrieved from Scott Westerfield’s “About the Author” official website –

I’ve also been an occasional ghost writer, which is like driving someone else’s car really, really fast for lots of money. (I could tell you what famous authors I ghost-wrote for, but then I’d have to kill you. My name can be found on three Powerpuff Girl choose your own adventures, however.) In my artsy days, I wrote music for artsy downtown New York dancers, some of which can be found at the bottom of my video page.

For my early adult books, check out the bottom of this page. Note that they aren’t particularly suitable for children.

I’m best known for my four sets of books for young adults. The most recent is the Leviathan trilogy. It’s a steampunk retelling of World War I, illustrated by the incomparable Keith Thompson. It features adventure, walking machines, and living airships! Read more about it here.

My most famous works are those of the Uglies series, set in a future where cosmetic surgery is compulsory when you turn 16, making everyone beautiful. Of course, there are some people who want to keep their own faces . . . and that’s not okay with the government. The series consists of a trilogy—UgliesPretties and Specials—as well as a companion novel, Extras.

I’ve written another YA trilogy called Midnighters, a tale of five teenagers born on the stroke of midnight, for whom time freezes every night, revealing a dark and terrible hidden world. My ancient, dorky website for the series is here.

I also have a set of books which is often called “The New York Trilogy,” three novels all set in contemporary New York, but not a real trilogy. The first is So Yesterday, about a cool hunter who runs afoul of a plot to end consumerism. The second is called Peeps, a “vampire” novel. The third is The Last Days, set in the same world as Peeps.

I was born in Texas, and split my time between New York City and Sydney, Australia. (I have more frequent flyer miles than you do.) You can read many personal details of my life on my blog.

Curriculum Ties:

  • Biology
  • Diseases
  • Epidemic
  • Survival

Booktalking Ideas:

  • How would you react if your ex-boyfriend/girlfriend informed you that you may have an STD?

Challenging Issues:

  • Sexual content

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

Why This Book? I found this book very interesting and how it was able to both educate and entertain me. It was fun to read all about the different parasites that have strange innate behaviors.

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Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller

batmanTitle: Batman: The Dark Knight Returns

Author: Frank Miller

ISBN: 978-1563893421

Publication Date: 1997

Genre: Graphic Novel

Reading Level/Interest Age: 15 and up

Plot: Bruce Wayne is now 55 years old and has long since retired his crime fighting alter ego Batman. Wayne is having trouble adjusting to normal life, the nightmares of his parent’s death still haunt him and the recent crime hike is bringing Gotham city down. At this point the allure of his mask and cape is enticing. Batman comes out of retirement to a world that does not remember him and is not ready for his return.

Critical Evaluation: A gritty and brutal look for the cape crusader, Frank Miller’s Dark Knight Returns is a very mature narrative for a comic book character. There are hints of political and social satire that can be found through out the book. Much of Batman’s dialog comes from his inner monologue, which really shows how he evaluates every situation and shows that you have to be a little crazy to dress up and fight crime at night.This is especially ironic since many of the criminals running loose on the streets are crazy themselves.

Reader’s Annotation: See how the success of this book helped pave the way for the modern Batman films.

Author: Retrieved from wikipedia.org –

Frank Miller (born January 27, 1957) is an American writer, artist, and film director best known for his dark comic book stories and graphic novels such as Ronin, Daredevil: Born Again, The Dark Knight Returns, Sin City, and 300. He also directed the film version of The Spirit, shared directing duties with Robert Rodriguez on Sin City and produced the film 300.

Curriculum Ties:

  • Political/government issues

Booktalking Ideas:

  • What countries have experienced governments similar to the Capitol?
  • Which side would you be on?

Challenging Issues:

  • Violence
  • Political satire
  • Cursing

Defensive Maneuvers:

  • I would be sure to study and memorize the library’s collection policy.
  • The Library Bill of Rights must also be brought to the challenger’s attention stating that the library is an information institution that provides both information and ideas.
  • Have both good and bad reviews (from respected sources) about the book at hand.
  • Remember to mention the awards and honors that the item has received.
  • Be sure to listen to the person who is challenging the book and do not interrupt them while they are speaking. Try to understand where the patron is coming from when he or she states their concerns about the material.
  • When you respond to the challenger, have a calm and respectable tone informing them that the library must do all that it can to provide intellectual freedom to its patrons, young and old.

 

Why This Book? After I read this it changed my perception of what comic book stories could be. The book showed that super heroes are not just for kids but could be used to tell a deep and mature story.

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